edge

Do You CIC What I CIC?

Picture courtesy Mark LyndersayMy name is Ken Jaikaransingh and I spent 17 years at St Mary’s, the College of the Immaculate Conception.

I come from a family of seven children in Upper St Vincent Street, probably the most diverse street in Port of Spain. Offices and government buildings dominated the lower southern end of the street. Our family home was a stone's throw from all of the city's cinemas, where I spent considerable time. Green Corner, the divide marking Upper St Vincent Street, was a magnet for activity. We pushed pans for Renegades, Desperadoes, Invaders and whoever else along the grass track leading to the Grand Stand. We roamed from Cascade to Carenage, Woodbrook to St James. St Clair and Maraval, where wealthier people lived, seemed somehow off-limits to us. We were more comfortable in the alleys of Belmont.

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I Is a Long Marooned Man

My name is Amon Saba Saakana and I’ve been marooned in Barbados since 10 January.

To get back home to Trinidad, I need an exemption from the Ministry of National Security. I’ve been assigned an automated number but complete deafness seems to have fallen upon the Ministry.

I was born in St James to a Grenadian father and Guyana-born mother. Whose grandparents had migrated from Barbados in the 1890s. They had three children, all born in Trinidad.

My wife the lovely Grenadian-born Seheri told me, when she was 21, that when I was ready to buy a house, she would put up half the deposit and half the furnishings cost. In 1987, we moved to our large semi-detached four-bedroom house with two living rooms. We are still resident in the same house after 33 years.

My father never went to a church while I was a boy in Trinidad and I have no concrete memories of my mother attending either. But we all went to Sunday school. The crazy Old Testament violence turned me off. So I stopped going to church at 11 [but] I was unconsciously brought up with moral behaviour.

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Non-Sleeping Beauty

Picture courtesy Mark LyndersayMy name is Jace Marley Hutton and I’m eight years old and, for the last six years and ten months, I’ve not been sleeping, like, at all! But NOW I’m a champion sleeper.

Yes, my parents named me after Bob.

I have to say this about my horse-crazy self: I don’t have OCD but I have OHD; Obsessive Horse Disorder. I LOVE horses. When I was three, my mom gave me a “pony experience” as a birthday present. I was, like, oh my gosh, that is so cool! Cause I LOVE horses. And I got to groom the pony, ride the pony, and I was, like, I can’t give this up! But I did have to stop for a couple of years because: 1. I had other hobbies; and 2. the stables, Horses Helping Humans, were moving all the way up to Maracas Valley.

My other hobbies were: dance; swimming; aerial silks. Not aerial socks, BC Pires! Aerial SILKS! There’s nothing called aerial SOCKS! You hang from a big silk hammock and do flips. I also did rhythmics, rhythmic gymnastics. It’s like normal gymnastics, except you do it with hoops and apparatus and big ribbons.

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English Accent, Trini Emphasis

Picture courtesy Mark Lyndersay

My name is Shane Collens and, when they hear my Queen’s English, BBC Radio accent, people don’t believe I was born in Trinidad.

My accent is more South Ken than Southend.

I’m fourth-generation Trinidadian and have lived here for 40 years. I was born in Henry Pierre Street, my father in Dere Street. My great-grandfather, the English implant, was posted here as Inspector of Schools which, today, would be the Minister of Education.

I’m from Cascade and have never wanted to live anywhere else. I have a view from the hillside. I can walk to Hi-Lo and the Savannah. I even walk Downtown. I love the exercise and, if you take the car, it takes as long to park as to walk.


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Bowling for Cascade

My name is Jade Rodriguez and I played cricket for Peru.

I’m half-Dominican, half-Trinidadian, born in the Dominican Republic. Mummy was a diplomat and we moved around A LOT! The only places we’d constantly go back to were Trinidad and the DR. Mummy never let me ever forget my ties to either of those cultures, the only constants in my life full of change.

Most of my Trinidadian relatives live in Cascade and that’s where I feel most at home. I first went to Trinidad when I was two months old and Mummy took the new baby to meet the Trini family. My grandpa didn’t even know Mummy had brought me to Trinidad. She left me in a basket on the doorstep of my grandpa’s house, rang the bell and hid. He opened the door, picked me up, took me inside, closed the door. No reaction. That pretty much defines my relationship with my grandpa now.

My grandpa used to umpire my matches. Whenever I went in to bat, the first thing he’d say to me is, “You’re out.” Anything going down leg side, he’d say, “You’re out!” Any ball he thought could have nicked my bat, I was out. He didn’t even care what the other umpire said, he gave me out. Then he’d tell me, [as I left the crease], “Do better [next time].”

I’m supposed to be in England now, playing cricket for the University of East London. But. Covid. Lockdown. Luckily, I can train where I am, in Barbados. I’m trying to play for Newham Cricket Club [after covid].

I’m graduating from university in May. I’m 20.

Read more

Show more posts

Do You CIC What I CIC?

Picture courtesy Mark LyndersayMy name is Ken Jaikaransingh and I spent 17 years at St Mary’s, the College of the Immaculate Conception.

I come from a family of seven children in Upper St Vincent Street, probably the most diverse street in Port of Spain. Offices and government buildings dominated the lower southern end of the street. Our family home was a stone's throw from all of the city's cinemas, where I spent considerable time. Green Corner, the divide marking Upper St Vincent Street, was a magnet for activity. We pushed pans for Renegades, Desperadoes, Invaders and whoever else along the grass track leading to the Grand Stand. We roamed from Cascade to Carenage, Woodbrook to St James. St Clair and Maraval, where wealthier people lived, seemed somehow off-limits to us. We were more comfortable in the alleys of Belmont.

Read more

I Is a Long Marooned Man

My name is Amon Saba Saakana and I’ve been marooned in Barbados since 10 January.

To get back home to Trinidad, I need an exemption from the Ministry of National Security. I’ve been assigned an automated number but complete deafness seems to have fallen upon the Ministry.

I was born in St James to a Grenadian father and Guyana-born mother. Whose grandparents had migrated from Barbados in the 1890s. They had three children, all born in Trinidad.

My wife the lovely Grenadian-born Seheri told me, when she was 21, that when I was ready to buy a house, she would put up half the deposit and half the furnishings cost. In 1987, we moved to our large semi-detached four-bedroom house with two living rooms. We are still resident in the same house after 33 years.

My father never went to a church while I was a boy in Trinidad and I have no concrete memories of my mother attending either. But we all went to Sunday school. The crazy Old Testament violence turned me off. So I stopped going to church at 11 [but] I was unconsciously brought up with moral behaviour.

Read more

Non-Sleeping Beauty

Picture courtesy Mark LyndersayMy name is Jace Marley Hutton and I’m eight years old and, for the last six years and ten months, I’ve not been sleeping, like, at all! But NOW I’m a champion sleeper.

Yes, my parents named me after Bob.

I have to say this about my horse-crazy self: I don’t have OCD but I have OHD; Obsessive Horse Disorder. I LOVE horses. When I was three, my mom gave me a “pony experience” as a birthday present. I was, like, oh my gosh, that is so cool! Cause I LOVE horses. And I got to groom the pony, ride the pony, and I was, like, I can’t give this up! But I did have to stop for a couple of years because: 1. I had other hobbies; and 2. the stables, Horses Helping Humans, were moving all the way up to Maracas Valley.

My other hobbies were: dance; swimming; aerial silks. Not aerial socks, BC Pires! Aerial SILKS! There’s nothing called aerial SOCKS! You hang from a big silk hammock and do flips. I also did rhythmics, rhythmic gymnastics. It’s like normal gymnastics, except you do it with hoops and apparatus and big ribbons.

Read more

English Accent, Trini Emphasis

Picture courtesy Mark Lyndersay

My name is Shane Collens and, when they hear my Queen’s English, BBC Radio accent, people don’t believe I was born in Trinidad.

My accent is more South Ken than Southend.

I’m fourth-generation Trinidadian and have lived here for 40 years. I was born in Henry Pierre Street, my father in Dere Street. My great-grandfather, the English implant, was posted here as Inspector of Schools which, today, would be the Minister of Education.

I’m from Cascade and have never wanted to live anywhere else. I have a view from the hillside. I can walk to Hi-Lo and the Savannah. I even walk Downtown. I love the exercise and, if you take the car, it takes as long to park as to walk.


Read more

Bowling for Cascade

My name is Jade Rodriguez and I played cricket for Peru.

I’m half-Dominican, half-Trinidadian, born in the Dominican Republic. Mummy was a diplomat and we moved around A LOT! The only places we’d constantly go back to were Trinidad and the DR. Mummy never let me ever forget my ties to either of those cultures, the only constants in my life full of change.

Most of my Trinidadian relatives live in Cascade and that’s where I feel most at home. I first went to Trinidad when I was two months old and Mummy took the new baby to meet the Trini family. My grandpa didn’t even know Mummy had brought me to Trinidad. She left me in a basket on the doorstep of my grandpa’s house, rang the bell and hid. He opened the door, picked me up, took me inside, closed the door. No reaction. That pretty much defines my relationship with my grandpa now.

My grandpa used to umpire my matches. Whenever I went in to bat, the first thing he’d say to me is, “You’re out.” Anything going down leg side, he’d say, “You’re out!” Any ball he thought could have nicked my bat, I was out. He didn’t even care what the other umpire said, he gave me out. Then he’d tell me, [as I left the crease], “Do better [next time].”

I’m supposed to be in England now, playing cricket for the University of East London. But. Covid. Lockdown. Luckily, I can train where I am, in Barbados. I’m trying to play for Newham Cricket Club [after covid].

I’m graduating from university in May. I’m 20.

Read more

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