edge

​Not So Happy Father’s Day

Photographs by Mark Lyndersay. My name is Ricardo Ali and I REAL miss my father on Father’s Day.

My nickname is Nosey. Because my nose big. And that stick now. But hopefully it will go. But now that I put it in the newspapers, it might last even longer.

I’m from Cunupia, from one of them area where everybody know everybody, from a real big family, counting my cousins and uncle, in the air-conditioning trade. But my family at home is just five of us. My dad passed away when I was about six. So is just my brother, two sisters, me and my mother. I’m 16 now. I’ll be 17 in November.

I went Cunupia Government Primary. And then I went ASJA Boys College. And then I leave out ASJA because of some family problems and I jump into the a/c thing. I accustomed, since primary school, to go with my cousins on job sites and thing. And I end up liking it. So, when that family problem come up, I decide to jump out school. It was before my daddy die that I went to earn, to help out my mother and sister and them.

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On Her Excellency’s Public Service

Picture courtesy Mark Lyndersay

My name is Cheryl Lala and I really don’t care what anybody thinks about me.


I’m Her Excellency, President Paula-Mae Weekes’s communications advisor. I care very much what people think about her.

I pronounce my first name with a hard “Ch”, Cher-ril. When people say, Sher-ril, I correct them. Every time. I ask them if they sit on a shair. And most people don’t get it when I tell them my surname, Lala, has two ells, not three.

I’m extremely single. For. The. Rest. Of. My. Life. I tell people who ask why I’m not in a relationship, “The problem with all-yuh is all-yuh don’t like to see a happy woman!”

I have a big sister, a big brother, me and my little sister. I fall kind of in the middle. Far from resenting it, I thoroughly enjoyed my middle child status! My elder sister was supervised to death. I was very “own way” and objected to close supervision. Still do, truth be told. With the others taking the brunt of parental attention, I slid by mostly under the radar.
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Our Father, Who Art Our Mother

My name is Adande Thomas and I walk my son, Adan, to school through the Botanical Gardens.

I born and grow Santa Cruz, Sam Boucaud Rd, Moraldo Trace. But I never played cricket with Brian Lara. Like how BC Pires tell me everybody from Santa Cruz does claim they once bowl out Brian. In my time, I wasn’t no bowler, so I used to more just go and admire him.

My father dead when I was three years. So it come like [I lost] my father and my mother. I grow up with my granny. She brought me up the best, no complaint. She was a mother and father to me. She died two years aback. I have a son, Adan Thomas, five, and a daughter, Monique Thomas, nine. Adan likes school a lot. He’s the brightest in his class.

I ain’t mind to take part in everybody little service, Christian, Jehovah, just to see what going on. I believe it have one God.

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Angling for Something Better

Picture courtesy Mark LyndersayMy name is Andrew Christopher and I fish at the mouth of the Diego Martin River.

I recently moved back to Cunupia. Before, I was living Trincity, by my grandparents. I buy a piece of land in Cunupia so I going to stay right there. I don’t have a family yet and my girlfriend living Grande. That’s why I buy a diesel truck. Whole weekend I going to Grande from Cunupia and then whole day Sunday is Carenage to fish.
I am not the kind to fete and lime. I prefer to come outside, throw a little line, relax, barbecue. I listen to soca music but not to say I big on it. I more prefer a little old school reggae. Bob Marley. Jah Mason.


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Easy Street, Cocorite

Picture courtesy Mark Lyndersay

My name is Chad Cropper and I’m a gas pump attendant.


I live in Cocorite, across the highway and up the hill from the gas station. So I could walk to work! Literally. I could zip-line and all.

When people hear, “Cocorite”, they think of crime and violence, but I feel safe because I grow up my whole life in Cocorite and I know 90 per cent of the people. I know most people who come into the gas station, too: customers; buddies; bredrens.

Cocorite was always stigmatised but boy days in Cocorite was fun. I can’t remember ever being afraid to go anywhere or do anything. Everybody would stay by anybody until whoever mother come home. Is like everybody really was one family.
Read more

Show more posts

​Not So Happy Father’s Day

Photographs by Mark Lyndersay. My name is Ricardo Ali and I REAL miss my father on Father’s Day.

My nickname is Nosey. Because my nose big. And that stick now. But hopefully it will go. But now that I put it in the newspapers, it might last even longer.

I’m from Cunupia, from one of them area where everybody know everybody, from a real big family, counting my cousins and uncle, in the air-conditioning trade. But my family at home is just five of us. My dad passed away when I was about six. So is just my brother, two sisters, me and my mother. I’m 16 now. I’ll be 17 in November.

I went Cunupia Government Primary. And then I went ASJA Boys College. And then I leave out ASJA because of some family problems and I jump into the a/c thing. I accustomed, since primary school, to go with my cousins on job sites and thing. And I end up liking it. So, when that family problem come up, I decide to jump out school. It was before my daddy die that I went to earn, to help out my mother and sister and them.

Read more

On Her Excellency’s Public Service

Picture courtesy Mark Lyndersay

My name is Cheryl Lala and I really don’t care what anybody thinks about me.


I’m Her Excellency, President Paula-Mae Weekes’s communications advisor. I care very much what people think about her.

I pronounce my first name with a hard “Ch”, Cher-ril. When people say, Sher-ril, I correct them. Every time. I ask them if they sit on a shair. And most people don’t get it when I tell them my surname, Lala, has two ells, not three.

I’m extremely single. For. The. Rest. Of. My. Life. I tell people who ask why I’m not in a relationship, “The problem with all-yuh is all-yuh don’t like to see a happy woman!”

I have a big sister, a big brother, me and my little sister. I fall kind of in the middle. Far from resenting it, I thoroughly enjoyed my middle child status! My elder sister was supervised to death. I was very “own way” and objected to close supervision. Still do, truth be told. With the others taking the brunt of parental attention, I slid by mostly under the radar.
Read more

Our Father, Who Art Our Mother

My name is Adande Thomas and I walk my son, Adan, to school through the Botanical Gardens.

I born and grow Santa Cruz, Sam Boucaud Rd, Moraldo Trace. But I never played cricket with Brian Lara. Like how BC Pires tell me everybody from Santa Cruz does claim they once bowl out Brian. In my time, I wasn’t no bowler, so I used to more just go and admire him.

My father dead when I was three years. So it come like [I lost] my father and my mother. I grow up with my granny. She brought me up the best, no complaint. She was a mother and father to me. She died two years aback. I have a son, Adan Thomas, five, and a daughter, Monique Thomas, nine. Adan likes school a lot. He’s the brightest in his class.

I ain’t mind to take part in everybody little service, Christian, Jehovah, just to see what going on. I believe it have one God.

Read more

Angling for Something Better

Picture courtesy Mark LyndersayMy name is Andrew Christopher and I fish at the mouth of the Diego Martin River.

I recently moved back to Cunupia. Before, I was living Trincity, by my grandparents. I buy a piece of land in Cunupia so I going to stay right there. I don’t have a family yet and my girlfriend living Grande. That’s why I buy a diesel truck. Whole weekend I going to Grande from Cunupia and then whole day Sunday is Carenage to fish.
I am not the kind to fete and lime. I prefer to come outside, throw a little line, relax, barbecue. I listen to soca music but not to say I big on it. I more prefer a little old school reggae. Bob Marley. Jah Mason.


Read more

Easy Street, Cocorite

Picture courtesy Mark Lyndersay

My name is Chad Cropper and I’m a gas pump attendant.


I live in Cocorite, across the highway and up the hill from the gas station. So I could walk to work! Literally. I could zip-line and all.

When people hear, “Cocorite”, they think of crime and violence, but I feel safe because I grow up my whole life in Cocorite and I know 90 per cent of the people. I know most people who come into the gas station, too: customers; buddies; bredrens.

Cocorite was always stigmatised but boy days in Cocorite was fun. I can’t remember ever being afraid to go anywhere or do anything. Everybody would stay by anybody until whoever mother come home. Is like everybody really was one family.
Read more

Show more posts