edge

​The Last of the Colonials

My name is Colin Leslie Beadon and I guess I am the last of Trinidad’s colonials.

I met my wife, Dion, in Texas. My first wife, June, my sons Robert & Glen’s mum, was a Trinidadian.

I would say my life really started when I got to Trinidad. I was an only child born in Burma in 1935. My father was a colonial policeman. When World War II was about to start, my parents took me to England. After a long voyage by ship, they left me with friends in England because my father had to go back to his job. I didn’t see him again until I was 11. But I never felt lonely in all that time. He was much too military for me. There were very many rules in the house.

My mother died when I was three. Well, she didn’t actually die. She committed suicide. I don’t remember her and it doesn’t hurt me to think now about what happened. I was very young. I was foster-homed but they were very good people. My father eventually married again. His wife, my stepmother, was Anglo-Burmese.

In WWII, my father, stepmother and their dog, Sweetie Pie, walked out of Burma into India. Like many other people, to get away from the Japs.

I was in boarding school from the age of six. I got my first canings then. You were warned that there were school rules and you either followed them or got caned. The rules included no fighting, and I was a big fighter, and no breaking school boundaries, and I was forever breaking school boundaries.
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​The Last of the Colonials

My name is Colin Leslie Beadon and I guess I am the last of Trinidad’s colonials.

I met my wife, Dion, in Texas. My first wife, June, my sons Robert & Glen’s mum, was a Trinidadian.

I would say my life really started when I got to Trinidad. I was an only child born in Burma in 1935. My father was a colonial policeman. When World War II was about to start, my parents took me to England. After a long voyage by ship, they left me with friends in England because my father had to go back to his job. I didn’t see him again until I was 11. But I never felt lonely in all that time. He was much too military for me. There were very many rules in the house.

My mother died when I was three. Well, she didn’t actually die. She committed suicide. I don’t remember her and it doesn’t hurt me to think now about what happened. I was very young. I was foster-homed but they were very good people. My father eventually married again. His wife, my stepmother, was Anglo-Burmese.

In WWII, my father, stepmother and their dog, Sweetie Pie, walked out of Burma into India. Like many other people, to get away from the Japs.

I was in boarding school from the age of six. I got my first canings then. You were warned that there were school rules and you either followed them or got caned. The rules included no fighting, and I was a big fighter, and no breaking school boundaries, and I was forever breaking school boundaries.
Read more

Show more posts