edge

Where the Man with the Mirror Gone?

A version of this feature first appeared in November 2010

Picture courtesy Mark LyndersayMy name is David Rudder and I’m a recording artist.

To me, Belmont, where I was born, is a metaphor for the whole country. Almost everybody in Trinidad artistic society passed through Belmont.
There’re still some of the old “livers”, as we call them, but most people in Belmont now rent a room to be close to work in Port of Spain during the week. And go to their real home on the weekend.

There were five of us children, four boys and one girl. I was the eldest and was always the one expected to “do something”. In a strange way, after 1986, I came like the eldest of the Trinidad family. You wouldn’t believe the amount of people expecting me to make good music every year, expecting me to do al kinds of things. I might come home and see two-three people who expecting me to give them a little change so they could go and buy milk because they broken. It travels in so many different ways, that kind of expectancy, after a while, you just feel tired. You’re drained.

Even now, when people know I’m in Trinidad, they call, “I want you to do this, I want that”. My greatest line from Trinidad – and they actually say this – is, “I want to use you for something”. They actually use the words, “I want to use you” – but like they don’t hear them. It’s something else.
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Where the Man with the Mirror Gone?

A version of this feature first appeared in November 2010

Picture courtesy Mark LyndersayMy name is David Rudder and I’m a recording artist.

To me, Belmont, where I was born, is a metaphor for the whole country. Almost everybody in Trinidad artistic society passed through Belmont.
There’re still some of the old “livers”, as we call them, but most people in Belmont now rent a room to be close to work in Port of Spain during the week. And go to their real home on the weekend.

There were five of us children, four boys and one girl. I was the eldest and was always the one expected to “do something”. In a strange way, after 1986, I came like the eldest of the Trinidad family. You wouldn’t believe the amount of people expecting me to make good music every year, expecting me to do al kinds of things. I might come home and see two-three people who expecting me to give them a little change so they could go and buy milk because they broken. It travels in so many different ways, that kind of expectancy, after a while, you just feel tired. You’re drained.

Even now, when people know I’m in Trinidad, they call, “I want you to do this, I want that”. My greatest line from Trinidad – and they actually say this – is, “I want to use you for something”. They actually use the words, “I want to use you” – but like they don’t hear them. It’s something else.
Read more

Show more posts