edge

Bowling for Cascade

My name is Jade Rodriguez and I played cricket for Peru.

I’m half-Dominican, half-Trinidadian, born in the Dominican Republic. Mummy was a diplomat and we moved around A LOT! The only places we’d constantly go back to were Trinidad and the DR. Mummy never let me ever forget my ties to either of those cultures, the only constants in my life full of change.

Most of my Trinidadian relatives live in Cascade and that’s where I feel most at home. I first went to Trinidad when I was two months old and Mummy took the new baby to meet the Trini family. My grandpa didn’t even know Mummy had brought me to Trinidad. She left me in a basket on the doorstep of my grandpa’s house, rang the bell and hid. He opened the door, picked me up, took me inside, closed the door. No reaction. That pretty much defines my relationship with my grandpa now.

My grandpa used to umpire my matches. Whenever I went in to bat, the first thing he’d say to me is, “You’re out.” Anything going down leg side, he’d say, “You’re out!” Any ball he thought could have nicked my bat, I was out. He didn’t even care what the other umpire said, he gave me out. Then he’d tell me, [as I left the crease], “Do better [next time].”

I’m supposed to be in England now, playing cricket for the University of East London. But. Covid. Lockdown. Luckily, I can train where I am, in Barbados. I’m trying to play for Newham Cricket Club [after covid].

I’m graduating from university in May. I’m 20.

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Bowling for Cascade

My name is Jade Rodriguez and I played cricket for Peru.

I’m half-Dominican, half-Trinidadian, born in the Dominican Republic. Mummy was a diplomat and we moved around A LOT! The only places we’d constantly go back to were Trinidad and the DR. Mummy never let me ever forget my ties to either of those cultures, the only constants in my life full of change.

Most of my Trinidadian relatives live in Cascade and that’s where I feel most at home. I first went to Trinidad when I was two months old and Mummy took the new baby to meet the Trini family. My grandpa didn’t even know Mummy had brought me to Trinidad. She left me in a basket on the doorstep of my grandpa’s house, rang the bell and hid. He opened the door, picked me up, took me inside, closed the door. No reaction. That pretty much defines my relationship with my grandpa now.

My grandpa used to umpire my matches. Whenever I went in to bat, the first thing he’d say to me is, “You’re out.” Anything going down leg side, he’d say, “You’re out!” Any ball he thought could have nicked my bat, I was out. He didn’t even care what the other umpire said, he gave me out. Then he’d tell me, [as I left the crease], “Do better [next time].”

I’m supposed to be in England now, playing cricket for the University of East London. But. Covid. Lockdown. Luckily, I can train where I am, in Barbados. I’m trying to play for Newham Cricket Club [after covid].

I’m graduating from university in May. I’m 20.

Read more

Show more posts